Down on the Allotment

What's happening down on the allotment? An intimate account of a passionate veggie grower.

Monday, June 15, 2009

Yard Long Beans

I planted a first sowing of Yard Long Beans direct in the soil in the middle of May. Unfortunately, germination was non-existent! I don't know if it was too hot, too cold, too dry or too wet - it was OK for the rest of my beans but not these. Anyway, a second sowing in modules in the greenhouse has been 100%. I also have some precious ruby red yard long beans which I am particularly looking forward to growing as I obtained them in a seed swap with the Seattle garden bloggers group 'SAGBUTT' (Seattle Area Garden Bloggers United to Talk) My climbing courgette Black Forest is going great guns at the moment as well. These were a good do-er for me last year, they climbed up a trellis all Summer long and were extremely productive.
Meanwhile in the greenhouse, these Ildi tomatoes have the most amazing display of trusses. There are probably more than about a hundred little yellow cherry tomatoes on each truss. Like little golden sweeties!
Meanwhile, below, these Great Wall of China tomatoes have an interesting habit too. They seem to have a truss of fruit every two set of leaves which is quite unusual.
Finally, there was a bit of storm activity over North and East London today, which I missed. I did see these storm clouds gathering in the Eastern sky over London this afternoon. This is an angry cumulonimbus cloud. If you are interested in different types of cloud formations, then why not click on the Cloud Appreciation Society website and go find some more.
Actually it looked a bit more dramatic in real life!

16 Comments:

At 11:36 PM, Blogger Robert said...

I tried yard long beans this year. They germinated fine on the windowsill, then keeped over and died as soon as they went into a cold frame. I think they need plenty of warmth.

 
At 11:51 PM, Blogger Dan said...

Things look like they are coming along nicely. I have also had bean problems this year. My purple podded poles, Kentucky Blue poles and Vermont Cranberry beans have not germinated in over 2 weeks now. The only ones that came up are the dragon tongue beans. The broad beans have started to put out beans though so that was good to see.

 
At 2:25 AM, Blogger islandgardener said...

My guess is that it was too cold outside for the beans, but inside, it was perfect. You seem to have different tomatoes than we have in the US -- yours aren't any that I know and I think I am pretty good with tomatoes!

 
At 4:38 AM, Anonymous kitsapFG said...

The tomatoes are definitely showing very prolific and interesting fruit formations!

 
At 7:49 AM, Anonymous Karen said...

Hi Matron - Looks like all is going along well despite angry clouds and the occasional bean failure. I really will cross my fingers for the red yard longs, I hope they don't disappoint! I'm so sorry that the Great Wall tomatoes didn't germinate for my mom. Yours look like they're doing great!

 
At 10:04 AM, Blogger Rowena... said...

Hi Matron,
Thanks for leaving a comment on Maddie the westie as now I've found a keen gardener with a lovely garden blog! I also keep a garden blog but post only once a week, preferring to use the site as more of a journal. I read a few of your older posts and LOVE that you are growing tomatillo. I've had flowers on mine for the longest time but they eventually dried up into nothing. I noticed that no bees seemed to be interested either, so I placed the plant next to the borage (of which the bees ADORE), and this morning watched one of them going pollen-happy in the tomatillo plant.

Love everything that you've got growing here. Tomatoes and squash are also my favorites!

 
At 10:59 AM, Blogger Carrie said...

Ah the Cloud Apprecation Society ~ I was introduced to that in October last year - Fabulous!!! Your photos are great, enjoy that wonderful harvest of toms, my goodness what will you do with them all!! x

 
At 11:27 AM, Blogger Vegetable Heaven said...

I've not tried yard longs but the only people I've heard of with success grew them in the greenhouse. They are particularly tender I suspect. Outdoors they will be inches long!

 
At 2:30 PM, Blogger Mr. H said...

Nice tomatoes! We just got our first little fruit starting to show on a "Bloody Butcher" plant. They are always one of the earliest for us, along with certain cherry tomatoes.

After a few years of trial and error, beans are the last thing I now plant. We often have miserable germination if it is not warm enough for the soil to dry out quickly. Even so, I still ended up replanting a bunch of cowpeas and Kabouli garbanzo beans... a new one for us.

Your plants always look so nice,

Mike

 
At 5:13 PM, Blogger Nicole said...

Wow, those tomatoes do have the most unusual flower/fruit formation. Hope you get to enjoy lots of ripe cherries soon.

 
At 10:08 PM, Anonymous easygardener said...

I think Yard long beans can only be grown under cover in this country - because they need a lot of warmth. Have you got room to grow some in a greenhouse? I'm getting quite excited about my first Courgette - I guess the novelty will wear off when I'm inundated with them.

 
At 8:13 AM, Anonymous Soilman said...

Top courgette, Matron. Mine aren't even flowering yet. Well impressed.

 
At 4:33 PM, Blogger Vaiva said...

Ok, I am puting the Ildi tomato on my wish list. I used to see photos on internet and I thought, maybe they are keeping two or three branches together - that is why they look so big, but in your photo it is obvious it IS big...

 
At 9:59 PM, Blogger Scarlett the Heavenly Healer said...

Unfortunately I got caught in the storm while I was at my allotment!

Beans look fab - wish mine were better...

 
At 4:28 AM, Blogger Kalena Michele said...

Those zucchinis (Black Forest) look divine! Mine keep blooming and falling off :( No fruit yet. But I still have hope!

 
At 6:57 AM, Anonymous Rumela said...

The yard-long bean is a popular choice in Asian communities for Thai curries, stews, and braised side dishes. Yard-long beans take about twice as long to cook as regular string beans. They have a nutty flavor, stronger than that of green beans. Yard-long beans are easy to grow, but they need more heat than I can give them in coastal Maine. Seed is widely available.

 

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